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An Overview Of When Domestic Rabbits Shed

By Tom Seest

When Do Domestic Rabbits Shed?

At BackyardBunnyNews, we help people who want to raise rabbits and bunnies by collating information about the hare-raising experience.

If you have a domestic rabbit and you’re wondering when they shed, you’ve come to the right place. Rabbits shed their hair during their molt. The hair falls off during this process and will be left on the floor. It can also be found in the rabbit’s feces. This is a good time to brush your rabbit to prevent excessive shedding.

When Do Domestic Rabbits Shed?

When Do Domestic Rabbits Shed?

Can Inbreeding Rabbits Trigger Shedding?

Shedding is a natural reaction of rabbits to changes in the length of day, but inbreeding can prevent this natural response and cause your rabbit to shed more than usual. Shedding can occur at any time of the year, and it may even be constant. The reason for this behavior is due to inbreeding, which disrupts the normal response of a rabbit’s cellular structure to changes in day length that trigger shedding.
Rabbits normally have two shedding seasons, usually three months apart, but the timing of each can vary. The temperature and the amount of sunlight trigger shedding, so be aware of when these seasons are in your region. It’s better to groom your rabbit during these months to minimize shedding.
Some rabbits develop an infection called Cheyletiella. This causes a thick layer of flaky skin that develops on their back, at the base of their tail, and along the spine. Although the cause of the infection is still unknown, most rabbits suffer from a low-grade infestation. Cheyletiella mites travel on hay and act as vectors for Myxomatosis, a disease affecting the rabbit’s internal organs.
Inbreeding can affect the body weight of the rabbit and disrupt the normal response to the changes in day length that trigger shedding. This can result in obesity. This can affect the lifespan of the animal and also affect the ability to raise a kit.
Inbreeding can also disrupt the rabbit’s circadian rhythm and thus cause the animal to shed more hair than normal. This can be a problem for rabbit owners as the affected rabbit may be unable to adjust to day length changes. Fortunately, these conditions are not life-threatening and can be treated by using natural light or reducing the amount of artificial light in the rabbit’s cage.

Can Inbreeding Rabbits Trigger Shedding?

Can Inbreeding Rabbits Trigger Shedding?

What Causes a Rabbit to Moult?

A rabbit’s molt starts on the head and moves down the neck, sides of the body, and rump. Sometimes, the molt can become stuck on a particular body part. In this case, the rabbit may require assistance from you to get the molt off. During this time, you should provide your rabbit with fiber to keep their coat healthy and dry.
Symptoms of a rabbit’s fur change: During molting, the rabbit’s fur will change color and lose a significant amount of hair. The fur will be looser than normal and holes will appear. In severe cases, the rabbit’s fur may start to fall out. While it is not dangerous for your rabbit to get a molt, it is important to seek veterinary help to get rid of the infection.
Molting rabbits typically shed more fur than normal during the spring and summer seasons. This process allows them to regulate their body temperature and prevent heat stroke and hypothermia. If your rabbit’s molt occurs out of season, you may need to check with your vet to ensure your rabbit’s health.
A healthy rabbit will molt twice or three times a year. While their molting pattern is fairly predictable, it is important not to let your rabbit lose a large amount of fur at a time. It can be a sign of stress or boredom.
Other symptoms of a rabbit’s molt include a lack of appetite, an increase in thirst, and increased urination. A rabbit with a severe case may eventually die from the disease.

What Causes a Rabbit to Moult?

What Causes a Rabbit to Moult?

What Causes a Rabbit to Shed Out Of Season?

If you notice that your domestic rabbit is shedding out of season, it may be a sign of a urinary tract infection. If this is the case, you should see a veterinarian immediately. Rabbits shed out of season because of a variety of factors, including a stressful environment or a urinary tract infection.
In most cases, excessive shedding is completely normal and is not a cause for alarm. But if the shedding occurs out of season or at a higher level than usual, this may be a sign of something more serious. To prevent excessive hair buildup and digestive problems, you should brush your rabbit regularly.
Excessive shedding can also indicate that your rabbit has mites. Mites irritate the skin and can cause dandruff and scaling. Excessive shedding can also be a symptom of gastrointestinal stasis, which can lead to colic and smaller droppings.
Rabbits undergo a molting cycle about every three months. The first molt occurs when they are four to five months old, and the second occurs when they reach the adult stage, around three months after that. During these periods, they will shed their entire coat in a short period of time. Usually, the shedding period will be slow at first and then increase in intensity as the season advances. The last couple of weeks of the molting period will be the slowest, with less fur.

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardBunnyNews to learn more about raising bunnies and rabbits.

What Causes a Rabbit to Shed Out Of Season?

What Causes a Rabbit to Shed Out Of Season?