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An Overview Of Things Rabbits Won’t Eat

By By Tom Seest

At BackyardBunnyNews, we help people who want to raise rabbits and bunnies by collating information about the hare-raising experience.

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardBunnyNews to learn more about raising bunnies and rabbits.

What Are Garden Plants That Rabbits Will Not Eat?

Let’s talk about something near and dear to my heart – gardening. Specifically, how to keep those pesky rabbits from munching on all your hard work. Now, I get it – bunnies are cute and all, but they can wreak havoc on your garden if you’re not careful.

But fear not, there are actually quite a few plants out there that rabbits just don’t care for. And let me tell you, it’s handy to have this knowledge in your back pocket.

According to the fine folks over at I Must Garden, there are a variety of plants that rabbits tend to steer clear of. We’re talking about annuals, perennials, bulbs, woody plants, fruits, and herbs. That’s a whole bunch of options to choose from, so you can still create a beautiful garden without worrying about those pesky critters chowing down.

Now, I know what you’re thinking – “But Tom, what are some of these magical plants that rabbits just won’t touch?” Well, I’m glad you asked. Some examples include daffodils, lavender, marigolds, and snapdragons. These plants not only add beauty to your garden but also serve as natural rabbit repellents.

So if you’re tired of seeing your veggies disappear overnight thanks to those furry little fiends, consider planting some of these rabbit-resistant plants. Your garden will thank you, and you’ll finally get to enjoy the fruits (and veggies) of your labor.

So there you have it, folks. Armed with this knowledge, you can outsmart those rabbits and keep your garden looking pristine. Happy gardening!

What Are Garden Plants That Rabbits Will Not Eat?

What Are Garden Plants That Rabbits Will Not Eat?

What Are Garden Plants That Rabbits Will Not Eat?

What Are Garden Plants That Rabbits Will Not Eat?

What Are Garden Plants That Rabbits Will Not Eat?

Will Rabbits Eat Lobularia Maritima?

When it comes to garden vegetables, Lobularia maritima stands out for one very important reason – it doesn’t attract rabbits. This perennial plant, also known as the floss flower, boasts clusters of tiny flowers in the spring, making it a delightful addition to any garden. But what truly sets Lobularia maritima apart is its ability to thrive in shady areas, unlike many other annuals. Alongside Lobularia, there are several other common vegetables and flowers that rabbits tend to steer clear of, such as lantana, pot marigold, wax begonia, Snapdragon, globe thistle, and sweet alyssum.

Thriving in both part shade and full sun, this perennial herb is not only aesthetically pleasing with its delicate clusters of spring flowers but also highly resilient to drought and heat. If you’re concerned about rabbits nibbling on your Lobularia maritima, consider sprinkling talcum powder or powdered red pepper on the plants to deter them. Alternatively, Irish Spring soap shavings scattered in the garden can also help protect your precious blooms.

One of the remarkable features of Lobularia maritima is its ability to bloom in various conditions, making it a versatile choice for any garden. Whether planted in partial shade or full sun, this plant exudes a pleasant scent that not only adds to its allure but can also help repel mosquitoes. In warm climates, Lobularia is known to bloom all year long, bringing a touch of beauty to any outdoor space. To keep your Lobularia thriving, be sure to plant it in a sunny location and provide occasional fertilization in the spring.

Not only does the scent of Lobularia maritima have the power to deter rabbits, but this plant also produces a milky sap and emits a fragrant aroma that can be quite pleasant to humans. Additionally, Lobularia works as a natural mosquito repellent, providing even more value to your garden beyond its aesthetic appeal.

Will Rabbits Eat Lobularia Maritima?

Will Rabbits Eat Lobularia Maritima?

Will Rabbits Eat Lobularia Maritima?

  • Lobularia maritima doesn’t attract rabbits.
  • Thrives in shady areas.
  • Other rabbit-resistant plants include lantana, pot marigold, wax begonia, Snapdragon, globe thistle, and sweet alyssum.
  • Resilient to drought and heat.
  • Can be deterred from rabbits with talcum powder or powdered red pepper.
  • Produces a pleasant scent that repels mosquitoes.
  • Works as a natural mosquito repellent.
Will Rabbits Eat Lobularia Maritima?

Will Rabbits Eat Lobularia Maritima?

Will Rabbits Eat Bee Balm?

Looking for a garden vegetable that rabbits won’t bother eating? Consider planting some Bee Balm. This versatile plant is not only edible but also adds a burst of color to your dishes. You can sprinkle it on your greens or fruit salads, mix it with apple cider vinegar for a delicious marinade, or even use it to make jelly and various baked treats. Bee Balm is a perennial that can be planted anytime between spring and fall, with beautiful blooms appearing in mid to late summer.

Bee Balm, a flowering herb with a minty orange fragrance, is a buzzing favorite among bees and other pollinating insects. Not only do bees and hummingbirds love it, but it also acts as a natural deterrent to rabbits and deer. For best results, plant your Bee Balm in full sun where it can thrive.

Originating from the eastern United States, Bee Balm is native to North America but has managed to spread far and wide across the continent. Whether you choose a perennial or annual variety, this plant attracts hummingbirds and bees with its abundant nectar, making it a valuable asset to your garden. Its vibrant and long-lasting flowers also make a striking addition to any floral arrangement.

So, if you’re looking to add some variety to your garden that won’t attract unwanted critters, Bee Balm might just be the perfect choice!

Will Rabbits Eat Bee Balm?

Will Rabbits Eat Bee Balm?

Will Rabbits Eat Bee Balm?

  • Consider planting Bee Balm as a garden vegetable that rabbits won’t eat.
  • Bee Balm is edible and adds color to dishes such as salads and marinades.
  • Plant Bee Balm anytime between spring and fall for beautiful blooms in mid to late summer.
  • Bee Balm is a flowering herb with a minty orange fragrance that attracts bees and hummingbirds.
  • Bee Balm acts as a natural deterrent to rabbits and deer.
  • Bee Balm is native to North America and attracts hummingbirds with its abundant nectar.
  • Bee Balm’s vibrant and long-lasting flowers make a striking addition to floral arrangements.
Will Rabbits Eat Bee Balm?

Will Rabbits Eat Bee Balm?

Will Rabbits Eat Wax Begonias?

Wax begonias, unlike many garden vegetables, are safe from the nibbling jaws of rabbits. These resilient plants offer beautiful leaves and flowers that can be enjoyed by humans. With a bitter taste and strong aroma, wax begonias thrive in partial shade, making them a versatile addition to any garden. They are well-suited for a variety of climates and can even be propagated indoors during the winter months.

Depending on your location, wax begonias can be grown as annuals in most parts of the US or as perennials in Zones 10-11. Their ease of cultivation and wide range of colors make them a popular choice among gardeners.

Whether planted in a container or flowerbed, wax begonias typically reach a height of one to two feet and spread about 30 cm wide. They require moist soil with a neutral to acidic pH and boast heart-shaped leaves that change color when exposed to sunlight. Clusters of delicate white flowers further enhance the plant’s appeal, creating a visually stunning display.

Known for their hardiness, wax begonias feature thick, waxy stems that protect them from wind damage and deter chewing pests. In fact, some varieties of wax begonias produce edible seeds, adding another layer of interest to these resilient plants.

Overall, wax begonias are an excellent choice for gardeners looking for low-maintenance, visually striking plants that can thrive in various conditions. Their ability to resist common gardening challenges makes them a reliable addition to any outdoor space, whether in a container on a patio or bordering a flowerbed in the backyard.

Will Rabbits Eat Wax Begonias?

Will Rabbits Eat Wax Begonias?

Will Rabbits Eat Wax Begonias?

  • Wax begonias are safe from rabbits and offer beautiful leaves and flowers.
  • They thrive in partial shade and are well-suited for a variety of climates.
  • Wax begonias can be grown as annuals or perennials, depending on the location.
  • They typically reach a height of one to two feet and spread about 30 cm wide.
  • Wax begonias require moist soil with a neutral to acidic pH.
  • They feature heart-shaped leaves that change color in sunlight and delicate white flowers.
  • Wax begonias are hardy plants with waxy stems that protect them from wind damage.
Will Rabbits Eat Wax Begonias?

Will Rabbits Eat Wax Begonias?

Will Rabbits Eat Globe Thistle?

Hey there, folks! If you’re looking to cultivate a garden vegetable that pesky rabbits will steer clear of, look no further than globe thistle. This resilient perennial is a no-fuss plant that will self-sow in the spring, eliminating the need for transplanting. Not only does globe thistle put up a strong defense against drought, but it can also thrive in a variety of growing conditions, making it a versatile addition to your garden.

With blooms ranging from vibrant blues to deep purples and snow whites, globe thistle adds a pop of color and visual interest to any garden space. This plant thrives in warm, dry climates and can adapt well to different soil types, including clay, sand, and loamy soil. To keep your globe thistle happy, aim for temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

While globe thistle can technically be planted anywhere, it thrives best in a sunny location where it can soak up plenty of sunlight. If you opt to grow it in a pot, ensure that the soil has adequate drainage to prevent the plant from becoming too tall and leggy. Give each plant some space, about 18 inches apart, to prevent competition with neighboring plants.

During the winter months, globe thistle benefits from a period of cold exposure to stimulate germination. You can sow seeds six to eight weeks before the last frost date, ensuring they receive ample light to sprout successfully. Consider using a grow light to provide additional support for germination.

Remember, gardening is all about experimentation and learning what works best for your unique growing conditions. Give globe thistle a try in your garden and watch as it adds beauty and resilience to your outdoor space.

Will Rabbits Eat Globe Thistle?

Will Rabbits Eat Globe Thistle?

Will Rabbits Eat Globe Thistle?

  • Globe thistle is a garden vegetable that rabbits tend to avoid.
  • It is a resilient perennial that self-sows in the spring.
  • Globe thistle is drought-resistant and can thrive in various growing conditions.
  • It has vibrant blooms in blues, purples, and whites.
  • Thrives in warm, dry climates and different soil types.
  • Best planted in sunny locations with good drainage.
  • Needs cold exposure in winter for germination.
Will Rabbits Eat Globe Thistle?

Will Rabbits Eat Globe Thistle?

Does Globe Thistle Attracts Pollinators?

Let’s talk about Globe Thistle, shall we? This remarkable plant is a favorite among gardeners for many reasons. Not only does it boast foliage and flowers that can endure for years, but it also serves as a crucial source of nectar for a variety of bees and butterflies. Additionally, its seeds contribute a unique texture to your garden, adding an extra layer of interest and charm.

Now, when it comes to cultivating Globe Thistle, you have a couple of options. You can grow it directly in soil or opt for a container if that better suits your needs. For optimal growth, well-drained soil is key. Consider utilizing a raised bed to improve drainage, or if that’s not feasible, containers with ample drainage holes and a layer of rock at the base will do the trick. Keep in mind that once Globe Thistle establishes itself, it prefers not to be relocated.

This plant is a dream for gardeners seeking low-maintenance options. It can tough out dry spells and excel in a xeriscaped garden, making it a versatile and adaptive choice. Thriving in hot climates, Globe Thistle flourishes best in full sun, so be sure to select a sunny spot for optimal results.

Here’s an interesting tidbit – did you know that Globe Thistle possesses a robust scent that repels rabbits? Its toxic foliage might deter pests, but fear not, the stunning flowers more than make up for it by attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. To keep your Globe Thistle happy, ensure it’s planted in well-drained soil with a slightly sandy texture.

Trust me, this captivating plant is a fantastic addition to any garden. So, why not give it a try and see the magic it brings to your outdoor space?

Does Globe Thistle Attracts Pollinators?

Does Globe Thistle Attracts Pollinators?

Does Globe Thistle Attracts Pollinators?

  • Globe Thistle is a favorite among gardeners for its enduring foliage and flowers.
  • It serves as a crucial source of nectar for bees and butterflies.
  • The seeds of Globe Thistle contribute a unique texture to the garden.
  • It can be grown directly in soil or in a container with well-drained soil.
  • Globe Thistle is low-maintenance and thrives in hot climates.
  • Its robust scent repels rabbits, while attracting butterflies and hummingbirds.
  • For optimal growth, plant Globe Thistle in well-drained soil with a sandy texture.
Does Globe Thistle Attracts Pollinators?

Does Globe Thistle Attracts Pollinators?

Does Globe Thistle Repel Rabbits?

Well now, if you’re looking to keep those pesky rabbits out of your garden, have I got a solution for you! Introducing the mighty globe thistle, a plant known for its ability to repel rabbits with its tough demeanor. This resilient perennial thrives in poor soil conditions, perfect for those dry patches in your garden that lack organic matter. Not only does it deter rabbits, but its gray-green leaves are like a beacon to bees and butterflies. The long-lasting flowers are a drought-tolerant treat for these pollinators, making your garden a buzzing hub of activity.

But wait, there’s more! The globe thistle isn’t just a one-trick pony. It also attracts beautiful butterflies and hummingbirds, adding a touch of whimsy to your outdoor space. And if you’re keen on expanding your anti-rabbit arsenal, consider adding mugwort or wormwood to your garden. These plants have been used for centuries in medicinal gardens and even lend themselves to making absinthe. For an aromatic twist, sprinkle some lavender around your garden. Rabbits can’t stand the smell, making it a handy addition to your rabbit-repelling toolkit.

This little powerhouse of a plant belongs to the Asteraceae family and hails from Europe and Asia. Its striking blue hues add a pop of color to any garden, with some cultivars boasting an array of colors to choose from. The blue globe thistle, in particular, has earned several gardening awards for its beauty and resilience.

So, if you’re ready to say “Hasta la vista, bunnies!” and welcome bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds into your garden, give the globe thistle a try. It’s a tough, beautiful, and beneficial addition to any garden space.

Does Globe Thistle Repel Rabbits?

Does Globe Thistle Repel Rabbits?

Does Globe Thistle Repel Rabbits?

  • Introducing the mighty globe thistle, a plant known for repelling rabbits.
  • It thrives in poor soil conditions and is perfect for dry patches.
  • Gray-green leaves attract bees and butterflies.
  • Long-lasting flowers are a treat for pollinators.
  • Attracts beautiful butterflies and hummingbirds.
  • Consider adding mugwort or wormwood for the anti-rabbit arsenal.
  • Globe thistle belongs to Asteraceae family, boasts striking blue hues.
Does Globe Thistle Repel Rabbits?

Does Globe Thistle Repel Rabbits?

Do Rabbits Eat Onions?

Let me tell you, folks, onions are like kryptonite to rabbits. These little critters won’t touch ’em with a ten-foot pole! Yep, deer and rabbits turn up their twitchy little noses at the mere whiff of an onion. Why, you ask? Well, it all boils down to that potent smell. Onions pack a punch that’s just too much for their delicate stomachs to handle.

These aromatic veggies belong to the illustrious allium family, along with leeks, garlic, and chives. Picture this – bulbous underground treasures, long green stems reaching for the sky, and clusters of lovely purple blooms. But wait, there’s more! They also boast a compound called quercetin, known for its health benefits in us humans. But for fluffy herbivores like rabbits, quercetin spells tummy troubles.

Now, here’s the kicker – onions aren’t the only veggies these hoppy critters avoid. Nope! You can also whip up a natural rabbit repellent using blood meal. It may sound gross to us, but to rabbits, it’s like a ‘nope’ sign flashing bright red. Just sprinkle this tangy concoction around your garden beds and plants, and watch those bunnies hightail it outta there.

So, remember, if you want to keep your garden safe from rabbit raids, steer clear of onions and opt for rabbit-friendly veggies instead. And hey, if you’re lucky, maybe those rabbits will bring along their deer buddies for a no-onion feast. Now, that’s what I call a win-win!

Do Rabbits Eat Onions?

Do Rabbits Eat Onions?

Do Rabbits Eat Onions?

Do Rabbits Eat Onions?

Do Rabbits Eat Onions?

Conclusion

In conclusion, when it comes to keeping rabbits out of your garden, there are plenty of plants to choose from that these furry critters just won’t touch. From daffodils to lavender, marigolds, snapdragons, wax begonias, and globe thistles, there are a variety of options that not only add beauty to your garden but also serve as natural rabbit repellents. By planting these rabbit-resistant plants, you can protect your hard work and enjoy the fruits of your labor without worrying about those pesky rabbits wreaking havoc on your garden.
Whether you choose Lobularia maritima, Bee Balm, wax begonias, or globe thistle, each plant offers unique benefits and characteristics that make them undesirable to rabbits. From their strong aromas to their bitter taste and toxic foliage, these plants have what it takes to keep rabbits at bay. In addition, they attract other beneficial insects like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds, adding even more value to your garden.
So, if you’re tired of seeing your veggies disappear overnight or want to create a garden that rabbits will steer clear of, consider incorporating these rabbit-resistant plants into your landscape. With a little bit of planning and some strategic planting, you can outsmart those rabbits and enjoy a beautiful and thriving garden. Happy gardening, folks!

Conclusion

Conclusion

Conclusion:

  • There are plenty of plants that rabbits won’t touch, such as daffodils, lavender, marigolds, snapdragons, wax begonias, and globe thistle.
  • These plants not only add beauty to your garden but also serve as natural rabbit repellents.
  • Each plant offers unique benefits and characteristics that make them undesirable to rabbits.
  • From strong aromas to bitter taste and toxic foliage, these plants help keep rabbits away.
  • Rabbit-resistant plants also attract beneficial insects like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.
  • Incorporating these plants into your garden can help protect your hard work and enjoy a thriving garden.
  • With some planning and strategic planting, you can outsmart rabbits and have a beautiful garden.
Conclusion

Conclusion

Other Resources

Other Resources

Other Resources

Here are some online articles about garden plants that rabbits typically avoid eating:

  • Is There Such a Thing as Rabbit-Proof Plants?
    Read more
    This article from The Spruce discusses various plants that rabbits are less likely to eat, including those with strong fragrances, fuzzy leaves, or toxic properties.
  • 19 Beautiful Rabbit-Resistant Plants for Your Flower Garden
    Read more
    Better Homes & Gardens lists 19 rabbit-resistant plants that can beautify your garden without attracting rabbits.
  • Rabbit-resistant plants / RHS Gardening
    Read more
    The Royal Horticultural Society provides a selection of plants that are relatively resistant to rabbits, offering choices to gardeners dealing with rabbit issues.
Other Resources

Other Resources

At BackyardBunnyNews, we help people who want to raise rabbits and bunnies by collating information about the hare-raising experience.

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardBunnyNews to learn more about raising bunnies and rabbits.