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Paws and Prey: Unveiling the Secret Bond Between Dogs and Bunnies

By Tom Seest

How Do Dogs and Baby Rabbits Get Along?

At BackyardBunnyNews, we help people who want to raise rabbits and bunnies by collating information about the hare-raising experience.

Fortunately, there are some safe practices you can implement if you have a pet dog and a baby rabbit in your backyard. First, you need to know which breeds of dogs are known to consume baby rabbits. Then, you need to keep them from getting into the baby rabbit’s nest.

How Do Dogs and Baby Rabbits Get Along?

How Do Dogs and Baby Rabbits Get Along?

Which Dogs Pose a Threat to Baby Rabbits in Your Yard?

Some breeds are more likely than others to consume baby rabbits in your backyard. If your dog has not been around rabbits before, you need to be cautious and keep an eye on your pet’s behavior. Some dogs will chase and kill rabbits, while others will simply play with them. Rabbit meat is not the healthiest source of protein for your dog, and it’s not a good idea to feed your dog raw rabbit meat.
Dogs of all sizes can be dangerous to baby rabbits. Small breeds are more likely to be aggressive toward them. They were bred to hunt small prey and have the natural instinct to chase small animals. Terriers, collies, and lurchers have a strong prey drive and should never be introduced to bunnies.
There are several breeds that have low prey drive and can get along well with baby rabbits. Miniature Doxies and Maltese are both good options because they’re lower-prey-drive dogs. The Bichon Frise is another option.
You can prevent your dog from eating baby rabbits in your backyard by avoiding dog behavior that could lead to your rabbit dying of shock. The dog needs to know when to stop and when to run away. It can be quite stressful for your baby rabbits if they don’t have a place to hide.

Which Dogs Pose a Threat to Baby Rabbits in Your Yard?

Which Dogs Pose a Threat to Baby Rabbits in Your Yard?

What Are the Surprising Habits of Pet Dogs?

It is advisable to keep pet dogs on a leash around baby rabbits in your backyard. Some of these animals are particularly vulnerable to dogs, so it is best to make sure your pet is leashed for at least three weeks. Another option is to use temporary fencing around the rabbits’ nest. This fence should have a hole on the ground level large enough for the mother rabbit to pass through.
The first thing you need to know about your dog’s behavior with baby rabbits is that most of them are able to escape the dog’s grasp. While some of them will kill the rabbit when they catch it, many of them will simply let it run away. This is not an uncommon behavior for dogs, and it is important to remember that it is part of their instinct.
The second thing you should know about pet dogs and rabbits is that they’re extremely particular about where they want to nest. If you move the nest, the mother will abandon the babies. The mother will also disclose the location of the nest to predators. So, you should try not to disturb the nest too much.
If you find out that your pet dog is consuming the rabbit poop, you should immediately take him to the veterinarian to get a proper diagnosis. Fortunately, this problem is not life-threatening, but it should be addressed to avoid any ill effects. For now, you can simply discourage your pet from eating the rabbit poop.

What Are the Surprising Habits of Pet Dogs?

What Are the Surprising Habits of Pet Dogs?

Can Dogs Safely Feed Baby Rabbits in Your Backyard?

Feeding a baby rabbit in the backyard can be a fun experience for both you and the bunny. Baby rabbits start eating at around two weeks and will eat alfalfa hay, carrots, and rabbit pellets. However, you should never feed your rabbit lettuce or cabbage.
The best time to feed your backyard rabbits is at dawn and dusk. This is the best time to feed your bunny because they spend less time eating during the day. You can’t expect your baby rabbit to eat much during the day because it will be afraid of daytime predators. For best results, keep the food out of high-traffic areas, like main walkways and doors.
While feeding a baby rabbit in the backyard can be a fun experience, you should also watch for symptoms of poor health. If your rabbit seems to have a low energy level or a hunched posture, it could be that it has a digestive problem. You should contact a veterinarian if you notice any of these symptoms.
If you have the space, you can feed your bunny by placing it in a plastic indoor cage. The box should be high-sided and have a lid to keep out drafts. The box should be in a warm, quiet area, and make sure it has hay on top of it. You can also keep your rabbit warm by covering the box with fur.

Can Dogs Safely Feed Baby Rabbits in Your Backyard?

Can Dogs Safely Feed Baby Rabbits in Your Backyard?

Will Fido Protect or Play With a Baby Rabbit in Your Yard?

If you have a dog, keep your distance from a wild rabbit’s nest. While it may be super cute and fascinating to watch, it’s important to make sure your dog doesn’t disturb it, as this will reduce the chances of the kit’s survival. Even if your dog does discover the nest, keep your distance and leave the area alone.
When the young rabbits leave the nest, you shouldn’t touch them. Young rabbits will easily be spotted by dogs and other predators, so try to avoid letting your pets play near the nest. Also, young rabbits develop fast, so it’s best to leave them alone until they’re older. Keep in mind that female rabbits only visit their nest twice a day, usually in the early morning and in the evening. If you do accidentally touch them, they may be frightened or injured.
Another option is to cordon off the nest to prevent dogs from coming near it. However, keep in mind that not all dog breeds are interested in baby rabbits. Some breeds simply ignore them. If you do have a pet rabbit, make sure to keep it in a safe location where it will be safe from your dog.
A mother rabbit won’t let her babies go outside alone if she’s scared of predators. She will usually leave the baby rabbits alone for a few hours every day. She will feed them occasionally, which may only take two to three minutes.

Will Fido Protect or Play With a Baby Rabbit in Your Yard?

Will Fido Protect or Play With a Baby Rabbit in Your Yard?

Will Your Dog See a Baby Rabbit as Prey or Playmate?

The best way to prevent dogs from eating a baby rabbit in the backyard is to train them to stay away from it. Using positive reinforcement is essential to desensitizing your dog. Dogs are attracted to bunnies and will play with them, but denying them this opportunity will prevent them from feeding on the rabbit. Alternatively, you can train your dog to ignore the rabbit using treats and commands.
While most dogs don’t develop any symptoms after consuming a rabbit, rabies is only transmitted to dogs who are not vaccinated. In addition, rabbit meat is not the healthiest protein for dogs, so if you think your dog might have eaten a rabbit, you need to take precautions.
If you’re worried that your dog may get infected by the animal, you can try placing it inside a newspaper-lined box or crate. The animal shouldn’t be allowed to eat it or drink it. If possible, seek advice from a professional. In addition, make sure you’re properly disposing of garbage. Make sure to rinse jars and crush cans before throwing them out. It is also a good idea to remove the rings from six-packs.
It’s also best to keep dogs on a leash until the baby rabbits have emerged. During this time, the mother will abandon the nest. This means that you’ll have to wait a while before your dog can pick them up. If you’re not able to do this, you can consider using temporary fencing to keep your baby rabbit safe. Make sure that the temporary fence is installed at ground level with a large enough hole for the mother to get through.

Will Your Dog See a Baby Rabbit as Prey or Playmate?

Will Your Dog See a Baby Rabbit as Prey or Playmate?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardBunnyNews to learn more about raising bunnies and rabbits.