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Join the Rabbit Revolution: Take Our Survey Now!

By Tom Seest

How Can Rabbit Breeders Help Shape the Future?

At BackyardBunnyNews, we help people who want to raise rabbits and bunnies by collating information about the hare-raising experience.

The British Rabbit Council is an organization of rabbit enthusiasts in the UK. They are the third most popular pet in the UK. The British Rabbit Council aims to help owners of breeding rabbits improve the welfare of their pets. They are also keen to educate people about the benefits of owning a rabbit.

How Can Rabbit Breeders Help Shape the Future?

How Can Rabbit Breeders Help Shape the Future?

Are You a Rabbit Breeder? Help Shape the Future with the British Rabbit Council!

The British Rabbit Council (BRC) has published a new Strategic Plan, which outlines their long-term goals. The plan is a large undertaking and aims to introduce new ideas and preserve rabbit history. The BRC is asking rabbit breeders to fill out a questionnaire that outlines their practices.
The British Rabbit Council is the leading rabbit organization in Europe. The BRC is responsible for regulating the Fancy and has developed a comprehensive set of show rules. The BRC has also set up a network of District Advisors, who are experienced members who give their time to support local rabbit hobbyists in their areas. The BRC also offers awards at shows.
The BRC is composed of exhibition and pet members. Those who show rabbits will need a license. The BRC is a good source of information about rabbit shows. It has a history of helping all rabbit breeders. Members of the BRC consider their membership a duty.
The BRC encourages research into diseases and promotes good rabbit keeping in pet owners. They receive hundreds of letters and phone calls every month asking for advice and information. The BRC also produces helpful leaflets and booklets for rabbit owners. Its monthly magazine, Fur & Feather, provides information for those interested in rabbit keeping.
BRC has published a Facebook page that promotes its research project. It also distributes the questionnaire on social media sites such as Twitter. Moreover, it reposts the questionnaire on rabbit breeding groups’ Facebook pages. The questionnaire closed for responses on 31 January 2018 and will be open again from 26 April to 30 June 2018.

Are You a Rabbit Breeder? Help Shape the Future with the British Rabbit Council!

Are You a Rabbit Breeder? Help Shape the Future with the British Rabbit Council!

Are You Helping Shape the Future of Rabbit Breeding?

The objectives of the British Rabbit Council are to promote responsible breeding and research into diseases that can affect rabbits. The British Rabbit Council also aims to educate pet rabbit owners on how to care for their rabbits. The British Rabbit Council receives hundreds of requests for information on rabbit care and health every month.
The Code of Practice for the Housing and Care of Animals for Scientific Purposes defines the minimum size of enclosures and requirements for furnishing. The Code also outlines separate requirements for breeding colonies and social partners. Similar guidelines exist for farmed rabbits, but there are no such guidelines for domestic rabbits.
While rabbits are one of the most popular types of pets in the UK, there is a lack of basic information on their welfare. For example, the British Rabbit Council is unaware of the exact number of rabbit breeds in the country. Despite this, research suggests that basic welfare needs are not being met for pet rabbits. This is concerning for the animal’s welfare and could affect the quality of life for pet rabbits in the UK.
The study was designed to address a gap in the knowledge of rabbit breeding in the UK and to provide insight into the demographics of the UK rabbit sales market. The survey used an online questionnaire to evaluate the conditions of housing and husbandry in UK breeding facilities. The results of the survey were compared to existing legislation and guidelines. The study also identified the status of licensing in the UK for rabbit breeders.

Are You Helping Shape the Future of Rabbit Breeding?

Are You Helping Shape the Future of Rabbit Breeding?

What Are Rabbit Breeders Doing to Ensure the Welfare of Their Animals?

While there is not a huge quantity of research on rabbit welfare issues, there is a large amount of concern about the welfare of these companion animals. The study aimed to identify and rank the most pressing concerns. It involved recruiting 12-20 rabbit welfare experts from a wide variety of stakeholder groups, including veterinarians, academics, industry representatives, and policy officials. The results showed that the issues that were of the greatest concern were those that involved reduced life expectancy, inadequate social groups, poor owner knowledge, and poor vaccinations.
Despite the fact that rabbits are the third most common species used for meat production, there are very few studies addressing their welfare. To address this, researchers developed a multidimensional approach to assess their welfare. They applied animal-based welfare measures to 30 conventional rabbit farms in Spain. These farms were incorporated into a certification scheme and were audited by the same auditor. The protocol includes four principles and eleven criteria to measure welfare.
As pets, rabbits are among the most popular pets in the UK. Despite this, they are underrepresented in government guidelines. As such, SRUC said that there is a need for regulation in the UK to ensure their welfare. According to the study, around one million pet rabbits live in the UK.
It is important to provide a good diet and care environment for rabbits. The environment should be free from harmful environments and should minimize the risks of injury and illness. Veterinary inspections should be performed on a daily basis to ensure that rabbits are healthy and are not suffering from diseases or parasites.

What Are Rabbit Breeders Doing to Ensure the Welfare of Their Animals?

What Are Rabbit Breeders Doing to Ensure the Welfare of Their Animals?

Is Your Council Represented? Join the British Rabbit Council’s Survey!

A FOI request to 40 British Rabbit Council councils in England and Scotland returned information on licenses issued in 2016, but the response rate was low. One council did not have the information requested and two reported that they did not have responsibility for licensing. One council had recently approved a new pet shop license for a rabbit breeder and another, Amber Valley Borough Council, had received an application for renewal of a license for a rabbit breeder and visited the applicant’s premises. The remaining 36 councils had no licensed rabbit breeders in 2017, according to their FOI requests.
While council licensing and the Animal Welfare Act (2006) may have once served as safeguards for rabbit welfare, such laws don’t seem to apply to the pet rabbit trade. While there may be a few licensed breeders in the UK, most are unlicensed and unaccountable.
One reason for this is that there is a huge supply of rabbits for sale. Some breeders advertise their animals for sale on pet classified websites. Pets4Homes is one such website. It identifies 3446 unique adverts for rabbits for sale. Of these, seven breeders are council-licensed, and 173 of them are located within council areas where FOI requests were sent. The rest are from rescue centers and private sellers. Most of the adverts are from England, with a small proportion from Wales and Scotland.
The Scottish government and the Welsh government have both issued guidelines for rabbit welfare. Although these guidelines are not legally binding, they offer guidance that is consistent with RWAF and RWAB. Scottish and Welsh government guidelines are less stringent than the RWAF and focus on efficient farming and scientific practices.

Is Your Council Represented? Join the British Rabbit Council's Survey!

Is Your Council Represented? Join the British Rabbit Council’s Survey!

Are You a UK Rabbit Breeder? Share Your Thoughts with the British Rabbit Council!

A questionnaire was developed to collect information about UK rabbit breeders. It was based on the Code of Practice for the Housing and Care of Animals. It outlines minimum standards for doe housing, pet shop license forms, and the five welfare needs. It also included questions on housing types and management practices. The questionnaire included both categorical and free-text options.
The questionnaire asked questions about the type of rabbits a person would like to own. The most popular types of rabbits were medium-sized and dwarf breeds. People also indicated their lack of preference for certain breeds, with pink-eyed rabbits coming out as the least popular choice. The survey found that a significant proportion of respondents would prefer to purchase a rabbit from a rescue center rather than a breeder.
The questionnaire received 33 responses. Most breeders kept six to 10 does, and four to six bucks and most breeders had multiple breeds in their herd. The most common breeds were Mini-lop, Netherland Dwarf, and Mini Rex. The least common breeds included New Zealand White, Mini Plush, and Silver Fox.
The questionnaire also asked rabbit breeders about the breed, housing, and welfare of their rabbits. It asked questions on the size of the litter, how often they breed, and how old they breed. The questionnaire also asked about rabbits and rabbit kits. It also asked about the care of rabbits, bedding, and hides.
Rabbit breeders should have a good relationship with a local veterinarian. It is helpful if the breeder can provide references and records of their rabbits’ health. If possible, he or she should also be willing to show the rabbits to prospective buyers. This way, he or she can guarantee their rabbits’ health and well-being.

Are You a UK Rabbit Breeder? Share Your Thoughts with the British Rabbit Council!

Are You a UK Rabbit Breeder? Share Your Thoughts with the British Rabbit Council!

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardBunnyNews to learn more about raising bunnies and rabbits.