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Discover the Thrilling World Of Thrianta Rabbit Shows

By Tom Seest

Are You Ready to Join Thrianta Rabbit Associations?

At BackyardBunnyNews, we help people who want to raise rabbits and bunnies by collating information about the hare-raising experience.

Thrianta rabbits stand out with their vivid orangey-red coat. ARBA recently recognized Thriantas on 1 February 2006, making them one of the newest breeds recognized.
Thrianta rabbits were developed in honor of the Dutch royal family by H. Andreae, a schoolteacher. While still relatively new in America, Thriantas have quickly gained in popularity, with low care requirements and enjoying bonds with their families.

Are You Ready to Join Thrianta Rabbit Associations?

Are You Ready to Join Thrianta Rabbit Associations?

What Makes the American Rabbit Breeders Association Stand Out?

The American Rabbit Breeders Association is an association comprised of individuals passionate about Thrianta Rabbits. Together, they work to improve rabbit quality and to raise awareness for this rare breed – with one goal in mind – keeping this beautiful species from going extinct. Unfortunately, keeping Thriantas from becoming extinct won’t be an easy task and takes considerable dedication from all involved; furthermore they provide education about Thrianta breed and its history to others.
Thrianta rabbits are striking, compact breeds with vibrant orange fur that boast medium-length ears that stand erect and an active and friendly temperament. Ideal as house or outdoor pets in all climates, Thriantas make great family pets for beginners in the breed with strong mothering instincts that lay down easily when handled.
As these pets tend to be friendly and playful with family members, grooming them every two or three weeks may help maintain a shinier coat. This is especially helpful during their molting season (usually summer).
H. Andreae from Assen in the Netherlands first created this breed in 1938 when he crossed Black Tan, Havana and self colored English Spot rabbits to create Thriantas. Unfortunately, World War II took its toll on these rabbits; many were either used as food sources or were combined with German rabbits during wartime; by its end many Thriantas had perished altogether.
Judith Oldenburg-Graf and Katherine Lynch played an essential role in bringing this rare breed to America, first presenting them at ARBA shows in 2001 in San Diego, CA, and in 2002 in Peoria, IL, but were rejected both times. Glen Carr presented again on November 5, 2003, in Wichita, Kansas, where it was unanimously approved by their Standards Committee, becoming officially recognized on February 1, 2006.
Rabbits make ideal companions for first-time rabbit owners, children, the elderly, and families with young children. As social animals that don’t require being caged or kept indoors for extended periods, rabbits thrive best when allowed to run freely in a safe environment such as an indoors or outdoor cage that has an elevated shelter that keeps predators at bay.
As part of the ARBA recognition process in the early 80s, multiple breeds were added to official ARBA lists of recognized breeds. Unfortunately, due to legislative restrictions after 1988, none were ever passed back through until 2005, when Thrianta Rabbits finally passed the committee for full recognition on February 1, 2006. They make an exceptional story of survival and devotion – you won’t regret adding one of these adorable rabbits into your home and family; their playful demeanor brings happiness! You will love their interactions with humans as much as their affection!

What Makes the American Rabbit Breeders Association Stand Out?

What Makes the American Rabbit Breeders Association Stand Out?

What sets the National Thrianta Rabbit Association apart?

The National Thrianta Rabbit Association is an association dedicated to preserving and raising the Thrianta rabbit breed. This beautiful and distinctive creature makes an excellent pet and show animal, yet it can still remain gentle enough for children.
H. Andreae created this breed of rabbit in 1938 as a tribute to Holland’s royal House of Orange. By crossing Black Tans, English Spot, and Havana rabbits together, he created something both distinct and colorful – which won recognition from both countries at that time – yet World War II soon put an end to many members.
Thriantas boast an orange-red coat that is both dense and soft. Their ears are short with red highlights, legs are stocky but short for barrel-shape legs, making this breed suitable for medium-sized breeders.
Gentle and easy-care rabbits make excellent first-time rabbit owners‘ choices; these friendly pets make for good pets for children as long as they learn how to treat their animal delicately and cautiously. Furthermore, these rabbits tend to be fairly resistant to common health issues like flystrike and overgrown teeth.
As with any pet, socializing your Thrianta as soon as it arrives is key to its wellbeing. This involves taking it out of its enclosure daily and introducing it to new people and animals in a controlled setting – this may include other rabbits, dogs or cats providing they are of an appropriate size and aren’t aggressive.
As with all domesticated rabbits, Thrianta requires daily care to stay healthy and content. Provide them with an indoor or outdoor rabbit run that is free from electrical cords and furniture that they could chew, and make sure that any outdoor hutch they reside in is predator-proof. Thrianta rabbits require a diet high in hay and low in pellets, as pellets may cause digestive issues. Furthermore, regularly checking ears for mites should help maintain good health in your pet. For those interested in adding one of these charming pets to their lives for years to come, contact a rabbit breeder near you to inquire about available litters – they may even match you up with one.

What sets the National Thrianta Rabbit Association apart?

What sets the National Thrianta Rabbit Association apart?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardBunnyNews to learn more about raising bunnies and rabbits.